Homesickness


Why am I homesick?

We all have an innate need to belong and we develop attachments to others in order to feel safe. Moving away from this support network can be stressful and, in some cases, can lead to anxiety and depression, which in turn can affect your well-being and academic performance. As you meet new people and develop new attachments, however, homesickness begins to fade and you will be able to explore and settle into your new environment.

Managing homesickness

Some level of homesickness is normal for anyone who has just moved into a new environment.  Here are a few strategies to help you make connections in your new environment and create a sense of belonging.

 

  • Familiarise yourself with people in your new environment. You don’t need to know a large number of people, but having at least one familiar face can help you to build a sense of belonging.
  • Do something fun with your new acquaintances. This will keep your thoughts away from things that make you miss home and help you get to know others better.
  • Make your new environment more like home. Decorate your new place with things that you like or pictures of your family and friends.
  • Share your feelings. Talk about being homesick with someone you trust and feel comfortable with. This helps you feel like you’re not alone with these feelings.
  • Try to keep a positive perspective. Start by thinking that the time you are spending away from home is very worthwhile and can bring new experiences and adventures.
  • Think of what your family and friends at home would say to you if they knew you were homesick. Just thinking of the support that you would get from people you love can help you feel less homesick.
  • Maintain connections with loved ones back home. Stay connected via phone, email, Skype, or another means that works for you and your loved ones. This can help you sustain important relationships while you explore and build new ones.
  • If you still continue to struggle with homesickness, reach out to the College via the Counselling Centre, or anyone in the Dean of Students Office.